Philip A. Lambert | University of New Brunswick

Background

On March 12, 2014, Mary Blatherwick, Ann Sherman, Bill McIver, Richard Hornsby, Ellen Rose, and Phil Lambert met to discuss the possibilities and potential of a Centre for Creativity at the University of New Brunswick. Possible purposes for such a centre that were discussed “included, research, conferences, special events, support for existing programs, community outreach, interdisciplinary and international initiatives. There was agreement that taking an interdisciplinary or cross curricular approach would be important.

It was suggested by Ellen Rose that we have a graduate student research centers for creativity that exist in Canada. This information was seen as essential for the grant writing process.

Phil Lambert agreed to do this research (M.L. Blatherwick, personal communication, May 12, 2014). The results of the research to-date are included in this report and will be presented at a meeting on May 22, 2014.
 

Method

Google searches were completed on the following: “Creative studies”; “Centre for creative studies”; “International center for creative studies”; “Creativity Institute”; “creative research centre”; “creative OR creativity AND centre OR institute AND university OR college AND research”; “creative OR creativity AND centre OR institute AND university OR college”. (‘AND’ was not actually entered, since it is implied in Googles standard search; it is included here for ease of understanding.) Initial searches were limited to Canada; however, due to the small number of useful results, the searches were run again with no geographic limitation. The first three pages of each set of results were evaluated for their appropriateness to this review.

In most cases, search results were not included in this report if the organization identified:

In addition, a research librarian at the Harriett Irving Library, the AUCC, and the Program Officer for Canada Research Chairs were contacted by email.
 

Results

A search of the AUCC database of university programs for the keyword creativity returned zero hits. The same search using creative returned 36 hits. The words following ‘creative’ and the number of hits were as follows:

  • Writing 27
  • Advertising 1
  • Photography 1
  • And performing arts 1
  • Communications 1
  • Arts 1
  • Non-fiction 1 (the concept of creative non-fiction has me intrigued)
  • Industries 1
  • Arts Therapies 1
  • Practices in Technical Production for Live Performance 1

Of the 36, only one seemed to be of interest for this study (Industries) and it was captured in a Google search.

The search of Canada Info Desk resulted in 12 hits, all considered inappropriate.

The College Canada Directory listed programs in Creative Advertising at Seneca, Creative Communications at Red River, Creative Technologies and Artisanship at George Brown, and Creative Writing at five colleges in BC. A search for ‘Creative Technologies and Artisanship ‘on George Brown’s website did not result in a match – presumably the program is no longer offered.

No other searches listed under ‘other searches’ above yielded anything useful. However, the Google searches resulted in 26 hits deemed appropriate enough to include here. They are listed in the section ‘Detailed Results’, along with comments, quotes from their websites, and hyperlinks to their websites.

While 24 organizations have been included in the detailed results section, many have been included for context, or just for interest’s sake. Only six organizations seem of primary interest for the task at hand. They have been summarized in the following section.
 

Results Summary

This section presents an overview of those centres that encompassed multiple attributes that may be considered appropriate for a creativity related centre at UNB.

Centre for Creativity King’s University College, Western

“The Centre for Studies in Creativity with its roots in the Department of Psychology has evolved into the interdisciplinary Centre for Creativity. The Centre supports and encourages creative endeavours in all areas of the arts and across diverse disciplines and cultures… The Centre for Creativity will nurture the development of an arena where manifestations of creativity can be explored within many contexts using a variety of formats: lectures, exhibitions, prose and poetry readings, musical events, film, photography, debates, symposia, and so forth.”

“Faculty Council approved in principle a proposal put forward by the Department of Psychology to establish a Centre for Studies in Creativity. Although the Centre was attached to the Department of Psychology, Dr. Jaroslav Havelka, one of the proponents, indicated to Faculty Council the intent to have an interdisciplinary focus.”

An interview with Vidya Natarajan, Ph.D, Academic Counselor/Instructor, Modern Languages, Chair of the Centre for Creativity, King's University College, Western University, yielded the following information: The Centre is funded from the Academic Dean’s budget. The board consists of three faculty, three community members and two to three students. The chair’s position is a voluntary and they also have an ad hoc work study student. The centre does not offer any for credit courses.

The Centre is a hub for people interested in creativity to meet. The have a few events, speakers (for example, Robert Kelly), and workshops. Twenty years ago, when it was part of the psychology department, they did support research and she believes they had their own peer reviewed journal.

Centre for Humanities Research and Creativity, Laurentian University

There is limited information about the centre available on their website, but from what information is there, this centre seems to present one approach to a possible centre at UNB. Attempts to set up an interview with the director were unsuccessful.

“The Centre for Humanities Research and Creativity (CHRC) facilitates research and creative projects that bring the academic excellence and artistic capability of the Humanities to both theoretical study and practical application.

To support Laurentian University’s innovative research initiatives, CHRC provides an institutional space for expertise in such fields as cultural studies, education, fine arts, history, languages, literature, music, philosophy and politics to generate research ideas inside the Humanities as well as through interdisciplinary collaborations. “

Established research clusters, this year affiliated with the CHRC, include the Pedagogy Research Cluster and the Feminist Research Cluster. Research clusters generally meet to discuss ideas, issues, or particular areas of research and creativity; they might stage open discussions or conferences; they might produce grant applications and collaborative writing.”

Creative Industries Program Ryerson

A very interesting program offered within the Faculty of Communication and Design at Ryerson University that extensively covers managing businesses and organizations in the creative economy. A few noteworthy courses from the 44 required and elective courses offered include: Imagining the Creative City, Entrepreneurship in Creative Industries, The Creative Process, and Creative Industries Research Methodology.

An email was sent to the VP of Research to determine if there was any research being done in the area of creativity. A prompt reply confirmed that there is.

“Unique among Canadian universities, Ryerson’s Creative Industries program studies the creative fields from the perspective of enterprise development and entrepreneurship, and blends artistic, media, communication, cultural and business studies to prepare students for employment opportunities or advanced education in today’s creative economy.”

“The interdisciplinary scope of our program requires an exceedingly diverse faculty with academic strengths ranging from the performing and media arts to business and public policy. Because no single academic unit can provide such a broad spectrum of academic expertise, the program has been conceived as a Faculty-wide initiative involving all eight professional schools within the Faculty of Communication & Design in partnership with the Ted Rogers School of Management.” Ryerson also has a Modern Literature and Culture Research Center.

Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity University of Saskatchewan

This centre may provide a good model for UNB. An interview with Sabrina Kehoe, the Associate Director, did not yield much outside of what is available on their website. They have a small staff and space where interdisciplinary teams and visiting scholars can come together on projects, research, or joint proposals. Funding is from the university budget.

“As the catalyst for creative and engaged scholarship in Humanities and Fine Arts, the Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity (ICCC) will strengthen the University's goal of research and artistic excellence. By connecting academic innovation, faculty talent, and student ambitions with areas of defined and emerging strengths, the ICCC will provide new opportunities for creativity, partnerships and community-building. Acting as a magnet for visiting scholars and artists, the ICCC will inspire, sustain and promote the artistic and scholarly work of our faculty and students.”

“Among its objectives the ICCC:

  • encourages graduate and undergraduate programming across departmental boundaries
  • increases the potential for research collaboration and funding success
  • improves the University's capacity to connect with external partner
  • attracts and sustains students, visiting scholars and artists, and faculty”

“The ICCC is committed to assisting departments and programmes within the division attract and retain the best and brightest PhD/MFA graduate students engaged in creative and or cultural interdisciplinary studies. To facilitate this, the ICCC will provide two Humanities and Fine Arts graduate students two years of top-up research funding to support the recruitment efforts of faculty and departments/programmes.”

The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation University of Calgary

Lynn Taylor, the vice-provost (teaching and learning), was interviewed on May 27th. Lynn was previously at Dalhousie University where she was the director of the Centre for Learning and Teaching for the university, and associate professor in the Division of Medical Education and the College of Sustainability.

The college was started, as part of the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, through a $40 million donation by the Taylor family. They promote cross-disciplinary learning and research and are building teaching and learning capacity across the university. They are in the early stages of building the program, but they are using small grants ($7,500 for practice, $10,000 for discovery, and $20,000 for collaborative teams) to promote creativity, innovation and collaboration.

“Research and learning go hand-in-hand. The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation, within the Taylor Institute, will provide all students with research opportunities from the very beginning of their undergraduate degree.”

“The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation will also bring together students from different faculties to collaborate on finding solutions to challenges facing society. It will ensure that University of Calgary students develop the critical thinking, problem-solving and research skills that will give them the edge in competing in a global economy. Creative solutions sparked by these student collaborations, with the guidance of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, academic staff and other leading experts, will also help Albertans tackle some of the world’s biggest issues.”

International Center for Studies in Creativity Buffalo State

“As the first and oldest degree granting program in creativity in the world [1967], the foundation of ICSC dates back to Alex Osborn's seminal work in creativity education in the 1940s and 1950s. Osborn was the developer of brainstorming and the originator of the Creative Problem Solving process… We offer a master of science degree in creative studies, a graduate certificate program in creativity and change leadership, and undergraduate minors in creative studies and leadership. These programs are designed to provide professionals with the necessary skills to become transformational leaders in their organizations and communities.”

“The ICSC offers a number of workshops that package aspects of the graduate curriculum for public audiences. These non-credit workshop experiences vary in length and focus on such topics as creative problem solving, small group facilitation, and creative approaches to leadership.”

Six faculty members are activity publishing in the field of creativity research, primarily in creative problem solving, teaching creativity, and intuition. Most masters students take the project option, one of two a year take the thesis route.

The Torrance Center™ for Creativity & Talent Development University of Georgia, College of Education

“The Torrance Center™ for Creativity & Talent Development is a service, research, and instructional center concerned with the identification and development of creative potential and with gifted and future studies. Its goals are to investigate, implement, and evaluate techniques for enhancing creative thinking and to facilitate national and international systems that support creative development.”

They offer a graduate interdisciplinary certificate in creativity and education, and a Summer Institute for Teachers where “creative thinking as a framework for curriculum development, classroom teaching and assessment” is explored. They also host organize the Future Problem Solving Program which “sponsors three different academic competitions for students in grades 4 through 12 during the school year. Each competition revolves around a six-step problem solving process.”
 

Detailed Results

This section presents an overview of all the centres reviewed for this report, whether they turned out to be inappropriate for the task at hand or not. This was done as a matter of completeness, hopefully giving the reader sufficient information to decide for her/himself which centres may be worth further investigation.

Brain and Creativity Institute University of Southern California

As might be expected from the name, the Brain and Creativity Institute investigates the neuroscience of creativity and related areas. For example, areas of research in their Brain and Music program include:

How does an intense music training method, such as El Sistema, change the developing human brain? How does it change the human mind? Does it have a distinctive positive effect on social behavior?

How does the brain process the emotions induced by music?

How does the brain hear music?

Creative Education Foundation “Where Brainstorming Began”

This is the legacy of the Alex Osborne - Sidney Parnes partnership. Alex Osborne was the originator of Brainstorming and the Creative Problem Solving method. Parnes researched, refined and taught the methods. The CEF offers training and consulting in the methods – particularly for teachers to apply in the classroom – hosts the annual CPSI conference, and publishes The Journal of Creative Behavior.

Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture University of Manitoba

“The Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture at the University of Manitoba, the first institute of its kind in North America, is a place for creativity, for scholarly research into oral and literate cultures, and for making connections between the University and the community. Opened in the fall of 2008, the Centre provides crucial support for students, faculty and community members who are working to create their own stories or who are studying the stories of others.”

“The Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture is an interdisciplinary, research-based facility that permits artists, scholars and students from diverse backgrounds to explore the transformative possibilities of the spoken and written word.”

Minimal staff and faculty (a director plus three staff). They maintain an extensive list of Call for Submissions.

Centre for Creativity King’s University College, Western

“The Centre for Studies in Creativity with its roots in the Department of Psychology has evolved into the interdisciplinary Centre for Creativity. The Centre supports and encourages creative endeavours in all areas of the arts and across diverse disciplines and cultures… The Centre for Creativity will nurture the development of an arena where manifestations of creativity can be explored within many contexts using a variety of formats: lectures, exhibitions, prose and poetry readings, musical events, film, photography, debates, symposia, and so forth.”

“Faculty Council approved in principle a proposal put forward by the Department of Psychology to establish a Centre for Studies in Creativity. Although the Centre was attached to the Department of Psychology, Dr. Jaroslav Havelka, one of the proponents, indicated to Faculty Council the intent to have an interdisciplinary focus.”

An interview with Vidya Natarajan, Ph.D, Academic Counselor/Instructor, Modern Languages, Chair of the Centre for Creativity, King's University College, Western University, yielded the following information: The Centre is funded from the Academic Dean’s budget. The board consists of three faculty, three community members and two to three students. The chair’s position is a voluntary and they also have an ad hoc work study student. The centre does not offer any for credit courses.

The Centre is a hub for people interested in creativity to meet. The have a few events, speakers (for example, Robert Kelly), and workshops. Twenty years ago, when it was part of the psychology department, they did support research and she believes they had their own peer reviewed journal.

Centre for Humanities Research and Creativity Laurentian University

There is limited information about the centre available on their website, but from what information is there, this centre seems to present one approach to a possible centre at UNB.

“The Centre for Humanities Research and Creativity (CHRC) facilitates research and creative projects that bring the academic excellence and artistic capability of the Humanities to both theoretical study and practical application.

To support Laurentian University’s innovative research initiatives, CHRC provides an institutional space for expertise in such fields as cultural studies, education, fine arts, history, languages, literature, music, philosophy and politics to generate research ideas inside the Humanities as well as through interdisciplinary collaborations. “

Established research clusters, this year affiliated with the CHRC, include the Pedagogy Research Cluster and the Feminist Research Cluster. Research clusters generally meet to discuss ideas, issues, or particular areas of research and creativity; they might stage open discussions or conferences; they might produce grant applications and collaborative writing.”

Certificate in Creative Studies Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin

Offers courses in art and design.

College for Creative Studies Detroit Michigan

A private college with undergraduate degrees in: Advertising – Copywriting, Advertising – Design, Art Education, Crafts, Entertainment Arts, Fine Arts, Graphic Design, Illustration, Interior Design, Photography, Product Design, Transportation Design, and graduate degrees in: Color and Material Design, Interaction Design, Interdisciplinary Design, Transportation Design.

College of Creative Studies University of California

Offers undergraduate degrees in one of eight disciplines (Art. Biology, Chemistry / Biochemistry, Computer Science, Literature, Mathematics, Music Composition, Physics) with a focus on research and creation of something new. There is not any focus on the research of creativity itself.

Creative Industries Program Ryerson

A very interesting program offered within the Faculty of Communication and Design at Ryerson University that extensively covers managing businesses and organizations in the creative economy. A few noteworthy courses from the 44 required and elective courses offered include: Imagining the Creative City, Entrepreneurship in Creative Industries, The Creative Process, Creative Industries Research Methodology.

“Unique among Canadian universities, Ryerson’s Creative Industries program studies the creative fields from the perspective of enterprise development and entrepreneurship, and blends artistic, media, communication, cultural and business studies to prepare students for employment opportunities or advanced education in today’s creative economy.”

“The interdisciplinary scope of our program requires an exceedingly diverse faculty with academic strengths ranging from the performing and media arts to business and public policy. Because no single academic unit can provide such a broad spectrum of academic expertise, the program has been conceived as a Faculty-wide initiative involving all eight professional schools within the Faculty of Communication & Design in partnership with the Ted Rogers School of Management.” Ryerson also has a Modern Literature and Culture Research Center.

Creative Studies Minor Texas A&M, Dept. of Educational Psychology

“The Creative Studies minor is designed to provide knowledge and strategies to help you think more creatively within the area of your future profession. Everyone has the ability to think more creatively. Our job is to help you develop and grow your creative ability. Creativity changes the way you think about personal and professional situations. “

One faculty member has research interests in: Creativity, Gifted and Talented Education, Instruction

The following 6 hours of course work are required: EPSY 430 Creativity Theories & Research, EPSY 433 Lateral Thinking: Systematic Innovative Thinking

Select 9 hours from the following courses: ENDS 101 Design Process, EPSY 431 Personal Creativity and Giftedness, EPSY 432 Creativity and Creative Problem Solving, EPSY 485 Directed Studies in Creativity.

Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies University of British Columbia

“The Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies offers programs leading to Bachelor of Arts degrees in Art History and Visual Culture, Creative Writing, Cultural Studies, French, English, and Spanish, and two Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Visual Arts and Interdisciplinary Performance. The Faculty also offers courses in German, Japanese, Film, Music, and the Digital Humanities.”

“Creative Studies is one of two departments in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies and consists of 17 faculty members in Creative WritingInterdisciplinary Performance, and Visual Arts (BFA). Creative Studies’ MFA program is unique in Canada and is designed to encourage an exchange of ideas and influences from non-studio and other academic disciplines reflecting the complex nature contemporary art and literary practice.”

“The Centre for Culture and Technology (CCT) was established in 2011 by FCCS professors Aleksandra Dulic and Stephen Foster to promote research that brings together art and science to develop a critical awareness of the dynamic relationship between culture and technology. As a laboratory engaged in innovative research, the CCT aims to develop content, artwork and services, support innovation processes, expand new knowledge transmission strategies for cultural expression, and communicate cultural knowledge to audiences across a range of age groups and cultures.”

All faculty research appears to be practice-based.

Gail Harker Center for Creative Arts Washington Creative Studies Center

Gail Harker Center for Creative Arts offers a comprehensive course schedule for artists of every level. Our internationally acclaimed faculty conducts certificate, diploma, and tutored courses in textile art, color studies, machine embroidery, paper and feltmaking, multimedia art, and dozens more.

Institute for the Creative Process Alberta College of Art and Design

This institute looks like it could be an excellent model for UNB, but there is very little information available on their website, beyond the following, and the ACAD course list does not include courses in creativity.

“The Institute exists to focus and organize the various activities, enterprises, and initiatives of ACAD with regard to the cultivation of dialogue, research, and special projects that directly address the nature of the creative process and design thinking.

The Institute is organized around a central notion: that the creative process can be identified, articulated, and applied to a wide range of issues and needs. For some, this will mean using that process as a way of crafting visual materials for business, for others it may mean using process steps to address the issues that concern many in our world: How does a community develop a sense of cohesion and common purpose? What is the optimum way to structure a learning environment? How can a corporation engender innovation within its ranks? How do various occupational groups manifest innovation in their work, and how might this be consciously approached in a variety of settings? How can wellness and health issues be addressed via a direct application and knowledge of the creative process? These and an infinite number of other topics are the business of the ICP@ACAD.

Our world requires this type of thinking. Communities want to be supportive of the "knowledge economy" even as they are in transition from earlier social models. Relationships between various groups are in flux, and societies search for solutions to the complex relationships that stem from change and migration. Artists, designers, and cultural producers of every stripe strive to express themselves in ways that can galvanize thought and stimulate new ideas, yet questions remain as to how they can sustain themselves as members of society. The corporate world needs people who can innovate, fuse ideas, and approach their endeavors within the context of a larger panorama. At the end of it all, our most worthy resource is people and their ability to consider, reason, and synthesize; we need to understand how to promote those qualities. These questions and more are in need of investigation, discourse, and finally, implementation of the creative process. That is the work of the Institute for the Creative Process at the Alberta College of Art + Design.

The process steps for design and innovation are understandable. They may be recognized by various terms: design thinking and theory, innovative process steps, and more. While we recognize that individual talents and abilities play a significant role in such undertakings, we also know that the creative/design process, the method by which solutions are found and new knowledge is discovered, is something that can be documented, researched, and applied to a broad range of issues. The mission of the ICP@ACAD is to study that process and share our findings, promote the articulation of it, and assist in applying that process to a variety of topics. The ICP will initiate projects that employ the creative and design process, apply it, and act as a vehicle for such thinking. Our world will be our laboratory.”

Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity University of Saskatchewan

This centre may provide a good model for UNB.

“As the catalyst for creative and engaged scholarship in Humanities and Fine Arts, the Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity (ICCC) will strengthen the University's goal of research and artistic excellence. By connecting academic innovation, faculty talent, and student ambitions with areas of defined and emerging strengths, the ICCC will provide new opportunities for creativity, partnerships and community-building. Acting as a magnet for visiting scholars and artists, the ICCC will inspire, sustain and promote the artistic and scholarly work of our faculty and students.”

“Among its objectives the ICCC:

  • encourages graduate and undergraduate programming across departmental boundaries
  • increases the potential for research collaboration and funding success
  • improves the University's capacity to connect with external partner
  • attracts and sustains students, visiting scholars and artists, and faculty”

“The ICCC is committed to assisting departments and programmes within the division attract and retain the best and brightest PhD/MFA graduate students engaged in creative and or cultural interdisciplinary studies. To facilitate this, the ICCC will provide two Humanities and Fine Arts graduate students two years of top-up research funding to support the recruitment efforts of faculty and departments/programmes.”

International Center for Studies in Creativity Buffalo State

“As the first school to offer both a master of science degree in creativity and a minor in creative studies, the ICSC has achieved an international reputation for scholarly research and teaching that focuses on developing creativity, leadership, decision-making and problem solving skills.”

"We offer a master of science degree in creative studies, a graduate certificate program in creativity and change leadership, and undergraduate minors in creative studies and leadership. These programs are designed to provide professionals with the necessary skills to become transformational leaders in their organizations and communities.”

“The ICSC offers a number of workshops that package aspects of the graduate curriculum for public audiences. These non-credit workshop experiences vary in length and focus on such topics as creative problem solving, small group facilitation, and creative approaches to leadership.”

Six faculty members are activity publishing in the field of creativity research, primarily in creative problem solving, teaching creativity, and intuition. Most masters students take the project option, one of two a year take the thesis route.

MEd in Curriculum Studies with a Focus on Creativity Open Acadia

An interesting program “designed to engage teachers and other educators in contemporary thinking that positions creativity at the center of curriculum”.

Saybrook University

“Our M.A. and Ph.D. degree programs in Psychology with a Specialization in Creativity Studies are distinguished by their comprehensive approach. By learning how to conduct psychological research in a cross-cultural educational environment, you will gain theoretical and practical understanding of the creative process. Saybrook's unique approach to creativity goes beyond the arts to encompass "everyday creativity," the originality of everyday life, which encourages personal and professional growth as well as health benefits. The program is designed to be applicable to a broad range of professional pursuit”

School of Creative Studies and Media Bangor University

Offering undergraduate degrees in: Creative Studies, Film, Journalism, Media and New Media, Theatre and Writing; graduate degree course in: Media Studies, Creative Writing, Journalism, Media and/or Film Practice, Film Studies, Theatre and Theatre Practice. “PhD research study is available in Media Studies, Creative Writing, Journalism, Media and/or Film Practice, Film Studies, Theatre and Theatre Practice, and in Creative Industries development areas.”

Creative Studies BA (Hons): “This innovative and unique degree allows you to pursue an interest in a variety of related subject areas such as Professional Writing, Film Studies, Theatre and Performance Studies, Journalism, Media, and New Media Studies. It aims to develop your critical and intellectual abilities as well as allowing you the opportunity to engage and explore many different areas of creative practice.”

Research: “We, in the School of Creative Studies and Media, contribute to the field of research through a variety of projects which compliment our main strengths: Digital culture, Media and persuasive communication, Creativity – Theory and Practice”

The Centre for Creative Communications Centennial College

Changed its name to The Story Arts Centre within the last month. It offers programs in: Advertising and Public Relations, Art and Design, Culture and Entertainment, Integrated Media, Journalism, Performing Arts. No information about faculty is available on the site.

The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation University of Calgary

Lynn Taylor, the vice-provost (teaching and learning), was interviewed on May 27th. Lynn was previously at Dalhousie University where she was the director of the Centre for Learning and Teaching for the university, and associate professor in the Division of Medical Education and the College of Sustainability.

The college was started, as part of the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning, through a $40 million donation by the Taylor family. They promote cross-disciplinary learning and research and are building teaching and learning capacity across the university. They are in the early stages of building the program, but they are using small grants ($7,500 for practice, $10,000 for discovery, and $20,000 for collaborative teams) to promote creativity, innovation and collaboration.

“Research and learning go hand-in-hand. The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation, within the Taylor Institute, will provide all students with research opportunities from the very beginning of their undergraduate degree.

The College of Discovery, Creativity and Innovation will also bring together students from different faculties to collaborate on finding solutions to challenges facing society. It will ensure that University of Calgary students develop the critical thinking, problem-solving and research skills that will give them the edge in competing in a global economy. Creative solutions sparked by these student collaborations, with the guidance of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, academic staff and other leading experts, will also help Albertans tackle some of the world’s biggest issues.”

The Creativity Centre

“The Creativity Centre Ltd is run by Dr Marilyn Fryer and Caroline Fryer Bolingbroke in collaboration with an international team of associates. Here are just a few of our activities over the last 12 years:

  • Advised on creative education for UK government departments and international organisations
  • Set up first international conference on Creativity & Cultural Diversity
  • Published articles, book chapters and books about creativity
  • Linked our interest in creativity with our interest in cultural diversity - producing books, toolkits and research reports.

Now we are moving our business online, with several new website projects underway including the Creativity & Human Development eJournal and a brand new creativity website which is still under wraps.

We are pretty unusual in that we're a mother and daughter team. As well as having our DNA in common, we're both passionate about creativity and its benefits in all sorts of areas of life.”

The Creativity Institute Melbourne, Australia

A private consultancy that does not do research and does not offer a complete education program – but does offer workshops. This link was included here because of the interesting links included on the site.

The Savannah College of Art and Design

SCAD The University for Creative Careers, offers a B.A, B.F.A., M.A., or M.F.A., in a wide variety of specialisations (Accessory Design, Advertising, Animation, Architectural History, Architecture, Art History, Arts, Administration, Cinema Studies, Design for Sustainability, Design Management, Dramatic Writing, Equestrian Studies, Fashion, Fashion Marketing and Management, Fibers, Film and Television, Foundation Studies, Furniture Design, General Education, Graphic Design, Historic Preservation, Illustration, Illustration Design, Industrial Design, Interactive Design and Game Development, Interior, Design, Jewelry, Luxury and Fashion Management, Motion Media Design, Painting, Performing Arts, Photography, Printmaking, Production Design, Sculpture, Sequential Art, Service Design, Sound Design, Television Producing, Themed Entertainment Design, Urban Design, Visual Effects, Writing).

Their complement of full and part-time faculty total around 700, 77% fulltime and 132 with Ph.D.s. Many have extensive lists of publications; however, it is not clear whether any of them research creativity specifically.

The School for Creative Studies Durham, NC

Grade 6-12 public. Any resident can apply; admission is through a lottery process.

“Our school vision is: Creativity. Communication. Collaboration. Community. Our theme centers on applied creativity, media, design, and communication arts. The program of study features coursework selections including Creative Entrepreneurship & Marketing, Digital Media & Design, Video Technology & Communications, Design for Living: Architectural Design, Music & Audio Production, Visual Arts, Healthful Living/Outdoor Education, and Spanish.”

The School of Humanities and Creativity at Sheridan College

“The School of Humanities and Creativity has a demonstrated commitment to innovation across disciplines, with courses in Art History, Classical Studies, Film and Media Studies, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Storytelling and Narrativity. The School also houses cross-disciplinary curriculum focused on the study of creativity and creative thinking, and is committed to fostering opportunities for cross-Faculty collaboration and community engagement.”

Noteworthy courses are: Psychology of Creativity, Creativity in Math, and Perspectives on Creativity.

The Torrance Center™ for Creativity & Talent Development University of Georgia, College of Education

“The Torrance Center™ for Creativity & Talent Development is a service, research, and instructional center concerned with the identification and development of creative potential and with gifted and future studies. Its goals are to investigate, implement, and evaluate techniques for enhancing creative thinking and to facilitate national and international systems that support creative development.”

They offer a graduate program interdisciplinary certificate in creativity and education, consisting of

“9 credit hours from:

EPSY6990/8990 1h Seminar: Creativity Research Group

EPSY6990/8990 1h Seminar: Creativity Research Group

EPSY6990/8990 1h Seminar: Creativity Research Group

EPSY8220 3h Creativity Theories

EPSY8160 3h Divergent and Creative Thinking

EPSY8260 3h Advanced Assessment of Creative Behavior and Potential

EPSY7240 3h Creativity: Instructional Procedures and Problem-solving Process

MGMT7310 3h Innovation Management

MGMT7320 3h Innovation Business Projects

SOWK/MNPO7423 3h Innovation and Change in Nonprofit Organizations

Elective Courses 6 credit hours from the list of Approved Electives

ARED8450 3 Art and Cognition

ARST7840 3 Interdisciplinary Collaborative Art

EADU8140 3 Impact of Gender and Race on Learning in the Workplace

EDUL8250 2 Designing Educational Learning Environments

EDUL8260 2 Designing Outside Learning Environments

JOUR5990 3 Entrepreneurial Journalism

ESCI6420 3 Science for Early Childhood

FDST4250/6250 3 New Food Product Development

GEOG8450 3 Geospatial Techniques in Landscape Analysis

LLED7732 3 Performance and Discourse Analysis

LLED7504 3 Reflective Practices in the TESOL Classroom: Poetry for Creative Educators

LLED/QUAL8590 3 Arts-Based Inquiry in Diverse Learning Communities

LLED/QUAL8650 3 Translingual Memoir

SPAN8100 3 Digital Humanities and Literatures

They also offer the Torrance Center Summer Institute for Teachers: “Come and explore the principles of creative thinking as a framework for curriculum development, classroom teaching and assessment. Designed around research-based strategies for integrating creativity into the classroom, the five day training will revolve around key strands such as Future Problem Solving, The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, Common Core Creativity, and Differentiation in the Creative Classroom. Educators will leave with practical creative strategies for enhancing their overall classroom instruction.”
 

Of Note:

“Creative studies is popping up on course lists and as a credential. Buffalo State, part of the State University of New York, plans a Ph.D. and already offers a master’s degree and undergraduate minor. Saybrook University in San Francisco has a master’s and certificate, and added a specialization to its psychology Ph.D. in 2011. Drexel University in Philadelphia has a three-year-old online master’s. St. Andrews University in Laurinburg, N.C., has added a minor. And creative studies offerings, sometimes with a transdisciplinary bent, are new options in business, education, digital media, humanities, arts, science and engineering programs across the country. Suddenly, says Russell G. Carpenter, program coordinator for a new minor in applied creative thinking at Eastern Kentucky University, “there is a larger conversation happening on campus: ‘Where does creativity fit into the E.K.U. student experience?’ ” Dr. Carpenter says 40 students from a broad array of fields, including nursing and justice and safety, have enrolled in the minor — a number he expects to double as more sections are added to introductory classes. Justice and safety? Students want tools to help them solve public safety problems and deal with community issues, Dr. Carpenter explains, and a credential to take to market. The credential’s worth is apparent to Mr. Lahue, a communication major who believes that a minor in the field carries a message. “It says: ‘This person is not a drone. They can use this skill set and apply themselves in other parts of the job.’ ” - See more at: http://www.creativityland.ca/category/blog/creativity-research/#sthash.vxtS7mNM.dpuf

Creativity Becomes an Academic Discipline - NYTimes.com

World Creativity and Innovation Week, WCIW happens every year from April 15 – 21.